Food Pictures from New Orleans

The Cheeseburger @ Port of Call: For me, a trip to New Orleans just isn’t complete without a visit to POC. Known for its large tropical drinks and its scaled-down menu, Port of Call offers only burgers and steaks, although I’ve only ever ordered the cheeseburger. Fries are not an option either — just baked potatoes. I could criticize the fake bacon bits, but they serve as part of the charm for me. Plus, the vibrant contrast of yellow and red give the plate a distinctly feng shui appearance.

If you still have a dial-up connection, you might want to close your browser and come back once you’ve entered the 21st century. I’ve uploaded most of my decent food photo from New Orleans, although this collection only represents a slight fraction of what I actually ate during my 10 days in the Big Easy. It was an epic tour de force, and I will add a few other photos as I am able (I snapped a few good pictures with a friend’s camera, as well). As far as documenting the trip was concerned, there were numerous times — dinners mostly– when the lighting just wasn’t sufficient, or maybe I just wasn’t willing to bring along my camera on certain days (such as Mardi Gras in the French Quarter). Nonetheless, I’ve found that these photos do represent a decent cross-section of my culinary exploits. And I can’t wait to get back.

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Muffaletta @ The Central Grocery: As the originators of this well-known sandwich, I suppose the Central Grocery represents the gold-standard, but I tasted other good ones, as well. Some of these included the versions at Cochon Butcher, Frankie & Johnny’s, and the “Frenchuletta” at Liuzza’s.

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The Fried Chicken @ Neyow’s Creole Cafe: Located at Bienville in Mid-City, Neyow’s is a delicious upstart with a menu filled with the classics. The plate above was only $8, which I thought was amazing. The mac and cheese features the same tiny macaroni as the infamous “blue box,” but this version is decidedly from scratch.

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Shrimp Po-boy @ The Gumbo Pot: Located over on Decatur in the French Quarter, the Gumbo Pot might seem a bit touristy, but the food is on point. I’m not convinced this sandwich features Leidenheimer bread, since the crust seems a bit dark, but it remains photogenic nonetheless.

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Still the best. I ordered the Turtle Soup and the Shrimp Po-Boy, like I always do. Should’ve gone twice.

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Sea Bass with Oyster Mushrooms @ Cafe Degas: Definitely a bit more “high-concept” than a lot of the other meals I ate. Cafe Degas is located by Bayou St. John, and actually represents a classic French bistro more than your typical New Orleans eatery. Great colors on this plate, although I wish the oyster mushrooms had been sauteed.

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Fried Oysters with Bacon Vinaigrette @ Cafe Degas. Not a bad start.

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Frankie & Johnny’s: So many great restaurants in New Orleans are retro-fitted houses. Unfortunately, these darkened, windowless dining rooms don’t allow for very good food photography. So be it. Note the “Gator Nuggets” on the specials board.

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Chicken & Andouille Gumbo @ The Gumbo Pot. Although this version of gumbo was delicious, I’ve found that I prefer a darker roux than the one pictured above. I also enjoy the texture of okra much more than I remember (I don’t think the gumbo above features okra) . I probably ate 10 versions of gumbo in 10 days.

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Pork Belly Sandwich @ Cochon Butcher, garnished with Cucumber, Mint and a Chili Aioli: This happening little lunch spot is affiliated with Cochon Restaurant on Tchopitoulas, and they offer some really amazing sandwiches, alongside house-made sausages and pates. Cured meats galore.

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Pancetta Mac & Cheese @ Cochon Butcher: The best I’ve ever tasted, anywhere. World class.

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Leidenheimer trucks are easy to spot in New Orleans. And they deliver the goodness.

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Pecan Fried Flounder with Mashed Potatoes and Cheese Grits @ K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen: Not my favorite picture, I admit, but I spent six months cooking at K-Paul’s, and I had to acknowledge this New Orleans institution. At dinner, this dish would be served on a real plate, and it would cost $30. At lunch, it was only $10.

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Bon Ton Cafe: I had a wonderful crawfish etoufee here, although the pictures from lunch didn’t turn out. Love the signage.

6 comments to Food Pictures from New Orleans

  • godfather

    great pictures.. now all you need is a picture of me trying to get into my pants after all that food

  • Rube

    Simply awesome man. Mouth watering just looking at all the goodness. Can’t wait for Jazzfest. Mandina’s at the top of my list. Jen’s requesting Mac ‘N Cheese so we’ll probably do Cochon after your review.

  • I so enjoyed your New Orleans photos! Thanks for sharing :)

  • I’m so glad the didn’t have okra in it. Traditionally, the filé gumbo, which it looks like you had never has okra in it. That’s a completely different gumbo ( and yes- preferred by many) altogether. Sadly, though, people now seem to do whatever they want with gumbo. Next time try the gumbo at Lil Dizzy’s. And for a more upscale Frenchy kind of meal, you just can’t beat the $20 lunch at Restaurant August. And yeah, I love everything at Cochon Butcher! Last time I was there, grabbed one last sandwich to go for the plane trip home.

  • The Accidental Wino

    I’ll be back in New Orleans for a short while in April. A return to August is definitely in order. The $20 lunch almost feels like stealing, it’s so good. I’ll try to search out Lil Dizzy’s!

  • Jon

    Lil Dizzy’s in on Esplanade on the way out to the fairgrounds. I didn’t think it was all that great. Butcher on the other hand….yeah you right!

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